This Off-Grid Tiny Hideaway Is a Minimalist's Dream

Author

FM Editors

Photographer

Rob Maver

This Off-Grid Tiny Hideaway Is a Minimalist's Dream

Off the coast of southern Tasmania, the bright and airy cabin is as secluded as can be

This Off-Grid Tiny Hideaway Is a Minimalist's Dream

Author

FM Editors

Photographer

Rob Maver

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Image courtesy Maguire + Devine Architects

Courtesy of your highly caffeinated and ever thankful editorial team at FM HQ

With wind howling outside and the reality of 4pm sunsets setting in, we can’t help but ramp up our already consistent day dreaming of a secluded cabin to escape to. Somewhere outside the reach of internet and email, where the number of “things to do” can be counted on one hand, and can be put off till tomorrow if we want. And well, that’s the beauty of this Architectural Inspiration series. And today’s installment, a 301-square-foot off-grid coastal cabin delivers on all accounts.

Situated on 99 acres of land on Bruny Island, off the coast of Tasmania, which is itself off the coast of Australia, this tiny cabin designed by Maguire + Devine Architects couldn’t get much more secluded. Though that doesn’t mean it’s entirely rustic. Inside the corrosive-resistant sheet metal and fire-resistant wood exterior, the bright interior offers all anyone could ask for in a home away from home—the architect’s brief was to design a space like a piece of furniture, with everything built in. A soaking tub set into one of the two exterior decks proves the point—there’s no roughing it here.

Light-colored wood covers every interior surface, connecting the space with the natural world surrounding it, with two massive east and west-facing decks accessed by equally large sliding glass doors further inviting the outside in—and nearly doubling the cabin’s square footage in the process too.

The translucent finish on the main doors references Japanese rice-paper screens, providing a sense of enclosure and privacy at night (not like you’d really need to worry about snooping neighbors, being way the hell out there and all), while also preventing local birds, including the endangered swift parrot, from accidentally flying into the glass.

Rain collection equipment and solar panels allow the off-grid structure to remain self sustaining, while a wood fired oven offers a place to bake—a touch of that rustic sensibility—and heats the house during colder months. A further Japanese-inspired seating area is set beside the main space’s massive south-facing window, while a sleeping loft above it completes the whole package.

And did we mention the deck tub? This is one cabin we won't stop dreaming about anytime soon.

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Image courtesy Maguire + Devine Architects
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Image courtesy Maguire + Devine Architects
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Image courtesy Maguire + Devine Architects
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Image courtesy Maguire + Devine Architects
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Image courtesy Maguire + Devine Architects
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Image courtesy Maguire + Devine Architects

Published 11-29-2018

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